Dividend update: March

By | April 2, 2016

Author: Mr DDU.

Disclaimer: Stocks mentioned on this blog are for general entertainment/documentation purposes only, following our own investment journey and decisions.Nothing in this article should be considered investment advice nor is intended to be investment advice. Please click here to continue reading our disclaimer. By viewing any page on this blog you are agreeing to the linked terms & conditions.

One day we want to be able to live purely off the income from our investments. The earlier this happens in our lives, the better.

How do we know if we’re getting any closer? By tracking it of course.

Our dividend updates and graphs run from 1st July to 30th June each year, lining up with the Australian tax year.

If you are reading this quite a bit later than when it was posted, information in this article might not be current, please read here to find our most recent posts on our Dividend Income.

Dividend Update

In March 2016 we were paid the following in cash and franking credits:

  • Challenger $34.24 Cash and $14.67 Franking Credits. Total $48.91. We have re-invested this dividend and will post our thoughts on their latest report soon.
  • Greencross Vets $10.44 Cash and $4.47 Franking Credits. Total $14.91
  • Combined: $44.68 Cash and $19.15 Franking Credits. Total $63.83.

Below is the graph showing our yearly dividend income so far:

Dividend Income March

With 9 months gone, that’s an average of $41.78 a month. The average is holding up after a great start to the year. April and May will also include dividends, so our average should be decent at the end of the tax year in June.

We like Challenger and Greencross both as companies and dividend payers, we expect each of their dividends to grow for many years to come.

How was your March for dividends?

 

Thanks for reading this article about our investing journey Down Under.

Onwards and upwards!

24 thoughts on “Dividend update: March

  1. Roadmap2Retire

    Congrats on the dividend income.

    R2R

  2. ambertreeleaves

    Nice passive income. Imagine what that will be in 10 years from now! The early start that you take is super.

    1. Dividends Down Under Post author

      Thanks for your comment ATL 🙂 We are very excited about what we are creating and the seeds that are being sown. It will make our lives much easier in the future doing this.

      After our IVF I’m really excited to see what we do.

        1. Dividends Down Under Post author

          Haha yes, I’m looking forward to that! It’s a funny thing wanting a baby, the first period of having the baby could be described as torture, but it will definitely be worth it.

  3. Team CF

    Lovely, you are already on track to get about 500 a year in dividends! That is a very nice amount.
    keep it up.
    Cheers!

  4. Investment Hunting

    These numbers are really impressive for a first year DGI investor. Echoing what some of the others said above; in 5-10 years this amount will be huge. All it takes is persistence. Great job.

    1. Dividends Down Under Post author

      Hey IH, thanks for your encouraging words. We know that with time we can make a huge success of our investing and like you say, in 5 years time (when some people’s investing journey is just beginning) we can make a huge difference. We think of it as a good starting block.

  5. Dividend Diplomats

    Great month! As IH said above, those are some impressive numbers as a first year DGI investor. Keep up the amazing work here.

    Bert

    1. Dividends Down Under Post author

      Hey Bert,

      Thanks for your comment 🙂 We are really lucky to be starting so young (like yourselves), we’re really excited to see what we can achieve in 10 years time.

  6. DivHut

    Nice passive income for the month of March and great average monthly income as well for just starting out on your journey. Time will be your best ally in generating a meaningful passive income stream and starting at your age give you a great advantage. Thanks for sharing.

    1. Dividends Down Under Post author

      Hey Divhut, thanks for coming by. We’re pleased with how much we have received so far in the year, we have to start somewhere and this is a good start for us. If we can focus on the long term, then we will be able to achieve great things in time.

  7. Pingback: Saving for the future: March | Dividends Down Under

  8. James

    What are your thoughts on the dividend ETF HVST to ensure a dividend each month or have you ruled out investing in ETFs?

    1. Dividends Down Under Post author

      Hi James, thanks for your comment, it’s always great to see a new name.

      We haven’t ruled out ETFs, I think one day we might invest in an S & P 500 ETF such as IVV. I don’t mind that we don’t get payments in certain months (at the moment), recently I have actually identified companies/REITs that do pay in those empty months so at some point down the road we’ll have every one covered.

      Regarding ETFs (and any index/fund type investment) for us it’s mostly the underlying breakup. HVST isn’t an index fund but I’d rather cherry pick for us some holdings like Macquarie & CSL than also get (in my opinion) not-so-great investments like Woolworths as part of the package.

  9. Pingback: Dividend update: April | Dividends Down Under

  10. Jef Miles

    Liking the amount of comments your getting on the site as a side note although see you’re getting some fairly consistent growth 🙂

    Keep up the good work guys!

  11. ZJ Thorne

    I would be interested in knowing how much money you had to put in to stocks to start seeing returns like this. I just don’t comprehend yet how much money it takes to build this sort of nest egg.

    1. Dividends Down Under

      Hey ZJ, thanks for commenting 🙂

      It really depends on the stocks you invest in. Say you invest $1k in a company whose yield is 6% and pays its divided twice each year, then each payment would be 3%. So a $1k investment would pay $30 each half year. All different types of companies have different yields and pay quarterly, half-yearly, every month or annually.

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